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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is parting with some of her toys. >> this is tigger. >> tigger is going to be hard. >> reporter: the florenc
and the u.s. involvement. one of the headlines in "the washington times" -- "the rebels move towards tripoli." the baltimore sun" with libya facing questions. the public and congress question the u.s. involvement. in "the wall street journal" this morning "the u.s. will not back intervention." we continue our discussion with involving the u.s. and its involvement in the situation in libya, two words. coming up, "regime change." what should the u.s. mission be as the situation continues to develop in libya and whether or not regime change should be on that list. the numbers are -- host: if you have called in the last 30 days, send us a message electronically. the e-mail address is journal@c- span.org. among the items in the paper talking about u.s. and its involvement in the libyan situation is this op-ed piece by fred stevens in "the wall street journal." "bolivia mission was never about regime change -- the libyan mission was never about regime change." in this, he quotes gates. "the mission was never about regime change." the article goes on to say "does this mean the mission accomplished"
on rebels this hour. new targets, more carnage and the intense pressure for u.s. military action. >>> also, the crisis that libya keeps pushing up gas prices across the country. that's creating more economic misery here at home, and new political danger for president obama. plus, protesters warn the u.s. congress may, may be on the brink of stoking new violence against muslims. anger and anticipation are building before controversial hearings this week on islamic extremism in america. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." libya centering the fourth week of what's now a full-fledged civil war. moammar gadhafi's forces are claiming new gains in their pounding of rebel-held cities. gadhafi maintaining a tight grip on the capital of tripoli, and the opposition appears to be holding out to benghazi in the east, but there are conflicting reports about who is in control of several other key cities, where fierce, fierce battles have been raging now for days. diplomatic sources at the united nations say the united states is working with france and britain on draft resolution on libya, a
there for the u.s. dollars is $32 a bulb. >> we were inspired. we both designed a bulb and installed them here. let's see how they >>> this morning on "world news now" -- breaking news. the nuclear threat in japan forces president obama to begin american evacuations. >> and because of a meltdown risk, families of u.s. embassy employees in japan are being urged to get out. it's thursday, march 17th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> and good morning, everyone, i'm mike marusarz in for rob nelson. >> i'm peggy bunker. that late development about evacuations of u.s. embassy families comes as a japanese military takes desperate steps to avoid a nuclear meltdown. can choppers with water make any difference? >>> also ahead, tough questions about nuclear safety here in the u.s. as the president stands by his plans to build more plants. >>> also, one very personal fund-raiser for tsunami and earthquake survivors in japan. a little girl's successful plan to sell her toys in order to raise money. a very sweet story. >> it is a sweet story. >>> we begin with that urgent action to
in the u.s. customers can expect better coverage. and also fewer pricing plans. >> let's hope. >> let's hope so. >>> here's your monday forecast, everybody. have some heavy rain in southern california. showers in san francisco, portland and seattle. another 2 feet of snow in the sierra range and a foot in the southern rockies. showers from the upper midwest to the ohio valley. a wintry mix in northern new england and rain here in new york and in philly. >>> 70s from dallas and miami. 64 in omaha. 60s from billings to salt lake city. near 70 in phoenix. >>> well, it was a stunning close encounter that was simply out of this world. >> pretty cool. i don't know if anybody saw this around here. take a look at this. it looked to the heavens saturday night. you were probably treated to a full moon like none other. scientists call this a super moon because it came so close to the earth. the closest it's come in nearly two decades. >> after the super moon rose in the east it appeared 14% larger and 30% brighter than a regular full moon. you said your dad is really into astrono astrono astrono
. the u.s. tells americans to evacuate the danger zone and sends in planes to get them out of japan. >>> and two exclusive interviews. tiger and trump. we go airborne with donald trump, who is sounding more like a candidate for president. >> part of the beauty of me is that i'm very rich. if i need $600 million, i can put up $600 million myself. >> and tiger tees off about his frustrations on the golf course. and the challenge of living life as a single dad. >>> and good morning, america, e on this st. patrick's day. the latest developments this morning. steam still rising from three of those nuclear reactors. one of those, worse, in fact. it shows the plant at a very critical point. and japanese officials saying, a slight radiation increase is too small to harm the people around tokyo. >> here's what happened when you were asleep. you saw the military helicopters. they tried to dump 30 tons of sea water on the reactors. they go over it. and a lot of the water dissipates before it hits them. even if all of it went in, all 30 tons, that would be a drop in the bucket. just to give you
there are no shortages, just worries. the white house says it's considering of tapping into the 727 million barrels of u.s. strategic oil reserves. >> it's something done on rare occasions. >> the strategic oil reserve is there for emergencies. this is not an emergency. >> reporter: one oil analyst says there's political pressure. for the president to lower prices. >> he can say, i can do something, and you are better off. what elected official would not want to do that. >> reporter: in the meantime, the squeeze is on. >> it's hard to ask our customers for increases right now. so we really have to suck it up and that really hurts. >> reporter: leaving drivers and gas tanks with an increasingly empty feeling. some analysts say when gas gets above $4 a gallon demands prices drop. but in many parts of the country, $4 a gallon gas is now a reality. rob and peggy. >> emily, thanks a lot. >>> that unrest in the middle east shows no signs of slowing. in libya, rebel forces say they're going to regroup and bring in heavy weapons. this after a punishing weekend of air strikes by forces loyal to leader moammar gadh
picketed the funeral of u.s. marine matthew snider, killed in iraq in 2006. snyder's father sued. >> i think it's an insult to every veteran out there that has served this country. >> reporter: the supreme court ruled the phelps are protected by the first amendment, right to free speech. chief justice roberts wrote for the majority. westboro may have chosen the picket location to increase publicity for its views and its speech may have been particularly hurtful to snyder. that does not mean that its speech should be afforded less than full first amendment protection. eight of the nine justices agreed. >> liberals and conservatives have united in this, on the side of free speech. >> reporter: justice samuel alito dissented, saying the phelps intentionally inflicted pain on the snyders. our commitment to free debate is not a license for an attack on matthew and his family at a time of acute emotional vulnerability central to the church's well practiced strategy for attracting public attention. now the phelps and their anti-gay campaign have won their biggest shot of publicity. steve hand
for gadhafi, to get him into exile. well get into that with the u.s. bourd to the united nations, susan rice. >>> first, we go to jake tapper at the white house. >> reporter: good morning, george. the president said a confluence of events compelled the u.s. to act to stop a massacre. a moral and a strategic case to act. and broad support for reaction throughout the world. but, george, that did not stop the president's critics. the president said they were a special set of circumstances. >> the united states has worked with our international partners to mobilize a broad coalition, secure an international mandate to protect civilians, stop an advancing army, prevent a massacre and establish a no-fly zone. >> reporter: also clearly informing his decision were lessons from two previous presidents. why would the u.s. not militarily seek regime change in libya? >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> reporter: but also the responsibility to prevent a massacre, as did not happen in the former yugoslavia during bill clinton's tenure in 1995. >> as president, i refuse to wait for images of
. meanwhile, the u.s. now says it has moved igts ships and aircraft away from one of the quake-stricken plants after discovering low-level radioactive contamination and "the new york times" reports that the "uss ronald reagan" passed through a radioactive cloud, causing crew members to receive a month's worth of radiation in about an hour. this is something we had a gut feeling about on friday morning as the story was unfolding and now it appears to be escalating. >> the first reports out that were none of the nuclear plants were affected. mika refused to read the script that way. you just sort of knew. if you had an 8.9 or 9.0 earthquake, these facilities could be impacted. that's the real story now. we have our newspaper segment. you look at all of the headlines here, whether it's the boston globe, if you look, this is what "the washington post" is talking about. again, japan across the top. the "usa today," they're talking about an anxious wait and it is an absolutely anxious wait. "the wall street journal," mika, when we talk about the nuclear situation, "the wall street journal" has it ri
monday night to explain the u.s. role in libya. and this morning in his weekly radio address, he defended sending forces there, and said the mission has been a success. david kerley is at the white house. david, the president appears to have gone on the offense, taking a lot of heat from both sides. >> reporter: he has taken a lot of criticism. you're starting to see the rollout this morning of the message from this white house that this is going well. and trying to explain to the american people what the president hopes to accomplish in libya. the weekly address today. tomorrow, you'll see the secretary of state and the defense secretary, on the sunday shows. and the speech by the president on monday night. the president spoke to 21 members of congress on a conference call, trying to nullify their concerns last night. >> and nato is supposed to take over libya tomorrow. how involved will the u.s. be in day-to-day operations there? >> reporter: that's a message that has not been very clear. the president says the u.s. is moving back from the leadership role as nato takes over. but the u.s
's response. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, meredith. the u.s. and its allies are escalating pressure on moammar gadhafi. the justice department is being asked to open a new investigation into whether the libyan leader personally ordered one of the worst terror attacks in u.s. history. for than two decades after more 270 people, including 19 americans, died in the bombing of pan am flight 103, shocking accusation from defectors, that moammar gadhafi may have himself ordered the terror attack. sparking calls for a new investigation. >> there have been statements made in the last days by what are now former members of the libyan government fingering gadhafi, making it clear that the order came from the very top. i think we need to move expeditiously. >> reporter: this after two administrations -- bush and obama -- dealt with gadhafi. some of the families of the lockerbie victims have written to president obama and say they are furious, sickened. stephanie's husband, michael, justice department lawyer, was on the flight. >> we had chosen to look the other way because of business
and frustration from muslim americans before some capitol hill hearings this week. they say the u.s. government is unfairly targeting them because of their religion. >>> you know she's got the golden touch. oprah winfrey has a knack for identifying new tv talent. we're going to meet a young comic in a wheelchair who is so promising he's landed his own show. >> on her network. inspiring story. >>> the fighting in libya has escalated drastically. gadhafi's military used gun ships, helicopters and rockets. to pound rebel forces. >> hospitals are now trying to cope with the constant flow of wounded fighters. lama hasan reports from benghazi. >> reporter: fierce battles raged on sunday's rebel fighters pushing westward toward tripoli were met by air attacks and ground forces loyal to libya's leader moammar gadhafi. >> all i saw is bombs and bullets. we were trying to escape and come back. i was begging everybody to, like, give me a ride. it was really scary. >> reporter: front line now appears to lie between two towns. they were telling us it was too dangerous to proceed.
of independence, and i know that is what you mean but there is no one picture of the u.s. in 1775, because there are so many different united states, if you will and it isn't the u.s. yet, they have the colonies and they have distinct cultures and economies. >> was there a similar political mood across all 13 colonies, in 1775? >> here we get to the issue, how could they ever act together? i think they could act together because they had the same political assumptions and political values and, they had a common enemy. there is nothing like an enemy to pull diverse elements together. and to the extent britain had begun to, first of all, to try to tax the colonies, although they weren't represented in parliament, and then, when the colonies resisted, followed with others, yes, they pulled together and understood the interest of any one colony was the interest of others, and if they could -- if britain could get by, for example, destroying the assembly of new york, because it had resisted a... refused to supply british troops, if they could do that in new york they could do that in any other
to exchange u.s. debt for state that? >> guest: profoundly important. this went into effect. all of the unrest in the states was in part a response to the taxation of the 1780s where the states were trying to retire their revolutionary war debt by taxes on land, a multiple of what they had been before and the people were very rested but hamilton proposed a brilliant idea, that all the state debts would become a natural death. national debt. he would issue bondss on the united states. a 4% rather than 6%. and didn't have to pay the principal we believe. all you had to pay was the interest. you could do that on the revenue that was coming and on the imports plus some excise taxes and the unfortunate run on whiskey. if basically what he did was to relieve a component of their budget which was the majority what we were raising money for. when the state and loggerhead to pay off their revolutionary war debt they no longer had to impose these taxes and the country became much more peaceful. >> host: next call from john in dallas. >> i'm reading about the history of propaganda in america. stuart spea
. they say the u.s. government is unfairly targeting them because of their religion. >> and you know she's got the golden touch. oprah winfrey has a knack for identifying new tv talent. we're going to meet a young comic in a wheelchair who is so promising he's landed his own show. >> on her network. inspiring story. >> absolutely. >> really is. >>> before that, the fighting in libya has escalated drastically. gadhafi's military used gun ships, helicopters and rockets. to found rebel forces. >> hospitals in the rebel-controlled cities are trying to cope with the constant flow of wounded fighters. lama hasan reports from benghazi. >> reporter: fierce battles raged on sunday's rebel fighters pushing westward toward tripoli were met by air attacks and ground forces loyal to libya's leader moammar gadhafi. >> bombs and bullets. we were trying to escape and come back. i was begging everybody to, like, give me a ride. it was really scary. >> reporter: front line now appears to lie between two towns ras lanuf and bin jawad. abc news was able to make it as far as brega before being turned around
to scale back u.s. military involvement in libya. >>> and tiger woods tees off in the arnold palmer invitational this afternoon. it has been a year since woods won a pro golf tournament. >> you know he's saying, please, let me win something. >> hope his putter works. >> oh, boy. okay. >>> finally, as you know, we do love animal stories around here. so, we could not pass up the chance to tell you about a cat in england named smokey. smokey the cat. >> name smokey the cat. reminds me of the movie "friday." they say when a cat is happy he purrs. smokey must be the happiest cat in the world. nick watt has the story. >> reporter: smokey seems pretty normal. fury, friendly, but that's because the volume's down. crank it -- unreal. and almost constant. is smokey the loudest cat in the world? 92 decibels. most cats peak at 20. but what does 92 decibels mean? well, it's louder than a washing machine. that's 70. about the same of a truck engine idling across the street and just a fraction less than what you would hear from a jet engine as a plane comes in to land. who's a nois
. maier we have twitter.n fromit >> what was the significance of alexander hamilton's plan to exchange u.s. debt for the state that? >> guest: a profoundly important proposal. all of the unrest on the states was in part response to the taxation of the 1780s which they tried to retire they revolutionary war by the taxes on the way and that were a multiple before but it was a brilliant idea that they could have become national debt. those issuing bonds on the united states paid 4% instead of 6% and not have to take the principal offo immediately but just the interest. the revenue that was coming from the taxes on the imports plus the excise tax including the unfortunate one on whiskey, but he basically what he did was to relieve the states of ant o component of the budget which was the majority ofit whaty they were raising money for.oney when the state's head noio longern to have the taxes than the country became more peaceful. >> host: in the next call comes from dallas. >> caller: i am reading the history of propaganda in america by ewing and he speaks of a massive propaganda machine like
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)